Entering the Lucid Space

Entering the Lucid Space

Ding! When the elevator doors slide open on the second floor of 117 East 5th Street, visitors are immediately transported from the student-riddled streets of a college town to a modern, chic industrial space akin to an office from Silicon Valley itself. Towering glass doors give way to a contemporary lobby sporting clean lines, an impressive view of downtown Tempe, and a reclaimed-wood wall with the sleek Lucid logo beaming from the center, welcoming clients and visitors to our not-so-humble abode.

This space hasn’t always been such a polished emblem of Millennial modernity—oh no, it’s origins are much simpler than that.

Prior to early 2014, the empty space that Lucid would eventually call home was nothing more than a vacant shell of concrete blocks and beams. Lucid founders Scott Kaufmann and Ken Bonham had been mulling over the idea of moving out of their building a few blocks over on Mill Avenue for years. The company was growing by leaps and bounds, and they knew they would soon need a larger space. The guys approached the City of Tempe and were presented with this space, which was essentially a blank canvas to craft the office of their dreams. After enlisting the aid of Builders Guild contractors and Evolution Design, they set out to transform the empty void into an office fit for tech royalty.

Construction began in August of 2014, unbeknownst to the Lucid staff. About a month in, after a strategy meeting, Scott and Ken casually announced the news of the new office and took the crew for a walk down the street from their then-current Mill Avenue digs to check it out. Surprise!

After a few months of meticulous design plans, grueling construction, and some logistical hiccups, the building was finally finished in November. When the Lucid team moved in the first week of December, the space had been transformed from an ugly duckling (see above) into a beautiful swan.

The new Lucid office is loaded with conveniences including two state-of-the-art conference rooms, a kitchen where the coffee flows like wine, a game area (complete with a ping pong table, foosball table, and Cornhole), a locker room with showers, and a “war room” for creative pow-wows. Other fun amenities include an always stocked bar cart, a movie-style popcorn maker, and a chalkboard wall used for inspirational doodles and Lucid musings. The main conference table was crafted using wood from Johnny Cash’s recording studio and the Pabst Blue Ribbon factory—yes, the beer company. The legs are made using reclaimed steel from ASU’s old Sun Devil Stadium scoreboard. Every detail in the office is carefully thought out and contributes to the unique yet homey feel of this modern industrial space.

Our central nervous system is an open-office floor plan with clusters of desks separated by low partitions, each area giving a hint into the personality of the Lucidite who inhabits it. The open-office concept allows for connectivity and collaboration within the office; if a member of the marketing team needs to chat with the tech team, they’re just a stroll away. An additional company, Find Your Influence (FYI), joined the party in the summer of 2015, making our office a true co-working space.

However, this style doesn’t come without its drawbacks. Different employees have different working styles. Some can tune out distractions and focus while others cannot, and the concrete industrial design doesn’t do much to muffle noise. To combat this problem we included two small, soundproof rooms that employees can use to make phone calls and have some privacy.

game-area-min

We think our office is pretty amazing—but don’t take our word for it, come see for yourself! If you’re ever in the area we’d love the opportunity to show you around. Feel free to stop by anytime for a riveting game of ping pong, or just to say hi.

Christine Lovstrom
[email protected]

Christine Zylla Lovstrom is the Communication Director at Lucid Agency, with a focus on internal communication and public relations. Christine is a proud ASU alumnus with B.S. in Marketing from W.P. Carey School of Business and a minor in Art History from the Herberger Institute of Design and the Arts. She enjoys combining the varied natures and influences of her education in her work and loves to debate word choice on the merits of connotation VS denotation, if anyone wants to take her up on it.

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